jump to navigation

Digital Strangelove – or How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Internet October 19, 2009

Posted by David Gillespie in advertising, best of, business strategy, digital strategy, social media, social networks, storytelling, strategy, technology.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
37 comments

I mentioned last week I had been staying in on weekends and up at night trying to get everything I was thinking about out of my head. The space I feel was created in my head is amazing, leaving room to think about a bunch of other projects I have on the go but have also played second fiddle to this.

I’m not presenting the below presentation as gospel, if I may be so bold as to quote myself, I am not looking for right, just for least wrong, as one of the premises I state in the presentation is that so much of this space will continue to change for a long time to come.

The deck covers a lot of ground, mainly from the point of view of where we are right now in the evolution of the Internet and culture, and where I think we’re going. I welcome feedback of all kinds, from bursts of agreement to arguments against each and every slide.

If I have moved the conversation along in even the slightest way, I have succeeded. As always, thanks for reading, I really appreciate your time.

You’re invisible now August 17, 2009

Posted by David Gillespie in creativity, digital strategy, technology, work/life.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
2 comments

I was going to title this “Princess on the steeple and all the pretty people” but that was too obscure, even for me. 5 bonus points to the person that picks the song without using “The Google“.

So my motivation has been a little lacking lately (alliteration = triple word score), and try as I might I hadn’t been able to rekindle it. I chatted long into the night with your friend and mine Matt Granfield who pointed me to his recent piece on sourcing the appropriate place to express a particular thought. I read it and it rang true, though it uncovered another thought of mine, that being a general wondering how long we will maintain digital identities we segment into neat boxes as if our own lives existed in a similar fashion.

And that’s when it occurred to me that something had recently clicked inside my head, and all of a sudden I realised that even using the word “digital” felt utterly redundant. When it permeates so much of what we do on a day to day basis it ceases to make sense in drawing any distinction. Having an afore-mentioned neat little box for it has worked until now, because for a long time it existed in a way we could separate and escape from. Now however we’re in a place where it no longer makes sense to segment it, and to not include some sort of digital element to a campaign, a product, a service, whatever is to commit commercial suicide (extreme viewpoint I know, prove me wrong!).

While this thought was buzzing around my head I swung by TIGS, as Faris had posted plenty while I’d been sunning myself in France. He, of course, had gotten here a little bit before me but along the same line of thinking, having said

Increasingly I’m finding the work ‘digital’ more of a hindrance than a help. It’s too broad to mean anything.

in the same post he linked a great Slideshare presentation from Helge Tennø, Strategic Director of Screenplay, an Oslo, Norway-based agency. Helge’s presentation is simply titled “Post-Digital Marketing”, and while I’m loathe to attach a new name to it, it seems to make sense. Have a look at the deck, it’s really quite lovely.

Of course Iain Tait beat us all there, telling me early in ’08 “digital is not a thing anymore”. I didn’t get it at the time, but I do now. My only concern is having canned UGC, social media, and now “digital” itself, I’m going to need to invent some new things just to shit on them.

And I’m quite OK with that. And I’m OK with not writing about “digital”, in fact I’m excited about it.

“You’re excited by a blog ostensibly about nothing?”

Yes.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Hope and Value April 29, 2008

Posted by David Gillespie in marketing.
Tags: , ,
1 comment so far

A couple weeks back I had the pleasure of speaking at an off-site day for Hippo Jobs where I am currently earning a crust heading up their product development and online strategy. I’d been banging on so much about value recently that I thought I’d subject my co-workers to it.

Along the way I had an insight though; what we were referring to as “value” internally was actually a price point, and value was something intangible; it meant something different to every person you could meet. Value was in fact set by the end consumer and not by the producer! I don’t know about you but that completely flips my thinking on it. So along the way I diverged from my original thoughts and tried to explore that idea a little bit more – thank you to Tara who clued me into the “willingness to pay” idea.

I don’t think I quite nailed it (nor do I think my presentation makes a whole lot of sense without me talking), but I’m not done thinking about this. I could be overstating it, but I think drilling down deeper on this notion of value is worthwhile, and it’s going to consume my thinking regardless. You’re already along for the ride, so you may as well get involved. What’s something that’s been genuinely valuable to you irrespective of the price point?

*Complete aside* – first time using Slideshare. I like it for the most part, and though Arun (who works there) took me through a few of the decisions around functionality, I still think it should load faster! =] Cheers mate.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.